Ingeneue's authors

Ingeneue was developed in the laboratory of Garrett Odell, Department of Zoology, University of Washington. The idea for Ingeneue and the actual code writing came from 3 graduate students, George von Dassow, Eli Meir, and Edwin Munro. Development of Ingeneue is continuing at the Center for Cell Dynamics, founded by the above individuals and supported by the NIGMS.

Here are short descriptions of each participant. Our individual emails are included below, but you can also email any questions/bug reports you have about Ingeneue to the general Ingeneue email address.

George von Dassow received his Ph.D. from the Zoology Department at the University of Washington. He has a research position at Friday Harbor Laboratories and works on both genetic networks and on cytoskeletal dynamics during cytokinesis.

Eli Meir runs SimBiotic Software, a company that produces software for biologists, particularly for teaching biology. SimBiotic Software plans to continue developing Ingeneue over the next few years along with the rest of the original authors.

Edwin Munro received his Ph.D. from the Zoology Department at the University of Washington. His primary work has been on morphogenesis, and particularly on how local interactions between cells may lead to global tissue shape changes. He is currently working on software for teaching neurobiology to undergraduates.

Garrett Odell is a professor in the Zoology Department at the University of Washington. He has a long-standing interest in modeling genetic networks (search Medline for references). His current primary focus is on understanding cytoskeletal dynamics in early drosophila embryos, and in the related problem of the mechanics of cytokinesis. Click here to see 3-d pictures of early drosophila embryos.

Additional programmers/maintainers:

Bill Sunderland received his Ph.D. from the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington. He also has a B.S. in Computer Science from Washington Universiry in St. Louis. He has contributed the graphical user interface for Ingeneue and built the Center for Cell Dynamics computational cluster.

Kerry Kim received his Ph.D. from the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington. He is designing extensions for Ingeneue and a version of Ingeneue in Mathematica.